Fed report: More Medicaid equals fewer addiction troubles in Florida

Hypodermic needles found in the trash at a cottage apartment by Jean Thomas, 83, in West Palm Beach's Prospect Park neighborhood. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

Hypodermic needles found in the trash at a cottage apartment by Jean Thomas, 83, in West Palm Beach’s Prospect Park neighborhood. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

Elevator scene from the National RX Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta:

Reporter to woman: Are you here for the conference?

Woman: Yes, I’m from Detroit.

Reporter: We’re from South Florida.

Woman: Oh, South Florida. That’s where you go when you’ve got money for treatment.

Or not.

On Monday, Health and Human Services released a report on just how many Floridians with addiction or mental health issues can’t get adequate help – in some cases, any help – because the state won’t expand Medicaid, a key feature of Obamacare.

(Comes a day before President Obama is slated to speak at the Summit. Coincidence? You decide.)

Anyway: Florida has fought tooth and nail against any such expansion, even though the rolls of Floridians on the health plan for the poor continues to rise.

About three in every ten people living below 138 percent of the poverty level need treatment for drug abuse or mental illness or both, HHS estimates.

From those numbers, the feds put together these numbers in the report:

  • 390,000: Number of uninsured Floridians age with either mental illness or an addiction problem who would qualify for treatment under Medicaid expansion. (For bragging right purposes, that’s second only to Texas among states without Medicaid expansion.)
  • Nine: Percentage of uninsured Floridians getting help for the above, 2010-14.
  • $7 million-$190 million. Budget savings range reported by different states which expanded Medicaid.
  • 17, 18, 33: Percentage drop in arrests among three groups of people frequently in trouble with the law after Washington state began providing them with Medicaid-financed substance abuse treatment.

We already tackled one tricky addiction math question this morning, one raised by this festive magazine cover.

Harpers' controversial piece on legalizing drugs- all drugs.

Harpers’ controversial piece on legalizing drugs- all drugs.

Stay tuned as Post reporters Christine Stapleton and Pat Beall cover the Summit live from Atlanta.  Stapleton and Beall are members of a team of reporters that have been investigating scams in Palm Beach County’s $1 billion drug treatment industry

The 8-month long investigation by the Palm Beach Post uncovered patient brokering, insurance fraud and kickbacks.

 

Reader Comments 0

0 comments