Will Florida’s prescription monitoring database broaden to share anonymous information?

Deaths linked to prescription oxycodone in Florida plummeted after drug monitoring database was adopted.

Deaths linked to prescription oxycodone in Florida plummeted after drug monitoring database was adopted.

Tallahassee could probably feel the love emanating all the way from the second floor of the Westin Peachtree in downtown Atlanta Tuesday morning: The object of affection at the 2016 Summit on RX Drug Abuse and Heroin is Florida’s Prescription Drug monitoring database, or EForcse.

Fought for since 2001, approved in 2009 and finally operational in October 2011, the database curbs doctor shopping for opioids by tracking prescriptions for the drugs.

It’s been wildly successful at curbing oxycodone-related overdose deaths in Florida, as its latest report shows. In fact, it’s considered a model for other states of just how effective such a database can be.

At a Summit seminar Tuesday morning, there was a discussion by program manager Rebecca Poston of possibly broadening its scope, by linking it to other databases, such as the database of drug-related deaths compiled annually by Florida medical examiners, or the state database on Hepatitis C infections.

The idea is to provide a sweeping look at Florida public health issues, particularly as it involves patterns of drug use.

Nothing on that scale is happening yet. Whether it occurs depends in part on the University of Florida securing a grant which would fund such a program. (EForcse gets no state money for its operations.)

But it raises a question of whether Florida’s lawmakers would resurrect the same privacy concerns they raised back in 2009 and later when arguing against establishing the prescription monitoring database at all.

Poston points out that, as envisioned, there would be no way an individual could be identified. You could not, for instance, be able to individually link Adam Smith to his oxycontin prescriptions, then his treatment for Hepatitis C, his medical treatment for addiction or his death from an overdose. The data would have no names attached.

Post reporters Christine Stapleton and Pat Beall are covering the Summit live from Atlanta. Look for continuing updates on The Insider blog.

 

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