Bills urge help for addicts in ERs and prompt RX drug reporting

Pharmacists and doctors who participate in the state’s prescription drug monitoring program would be required to report every prescription they fill for opiates and other controlled substances within 24 hours under a bill introduced on Friday.

HB 557 was filed by Rep. Nicholas Duran, D-Miami. There is no companion bill in the Senate. 

Currently, pharmacists and doctors who participate in the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program have seven days to report controlled substances they dispense.

Although participation in the PDMP is not mandatory, the database improves clinical decision-making and can identify doctor shopping and pill mills.

» Read the Post’s coverage of the opioid epidemic »

Currently, 6,546 pharmacists and doctors input their prescribing data into the PDMP database. Sixty-six percent of participants already report data within 24-hours.

The database contains 37,048,030 prescriptions for 7.3 million Florida residents.

Also on Friday, Republican Sen. Kathleen Passidomo filed SB 558, which would require hospitals to provide additional services to overdose patients. Passidomo, vice-chair of the Senate Committee on Health Policy and Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and Human Services, represents Collier, Hendry and parts of Lee counties – all hard hit by the opioid epidemic.

The bill mirrors HB 61, filed by Rep. Larry Lee, D-Port St. Lucie, which requires hospitals to screen overdose patients to determine the need for additional services and prohibits hospitals from discharging overdose patients to a detox or drug treatment center until the patient is stable.

The bills also require attending physicians to contact the overdose patient’s primary care physician or any other treatment providers who prescribed a controlled substance to the patient.

If the patient is currently in a treatment program, the hospital’s attending physician must also inform the medical director at the treatment center about the overdose.

The bill would also require the hospital to inform an overdose patient’s family or emergency contact about the overdose

 

 

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