Derek Jeter opens youth addiction treatment center in Tampa

Derek Jeter, the former New York Yankees star who is trying to buy the Miami Marlins, has opened a new treatment center for teenagers addicted to drugs and alcohol.

Derek Jeter in action at Marlins Park in 2012, FL. (Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post)

“We understand everyone has bumps in the roads and difficult times we want them to know that there are places you can go to for support,” Jeter told reporters last week at the dedication of the Derek Jeter Youth Addiction Treatment Center at The Phoenix House.

The facility outside Tampa was paid for in part by a $850,000 by the Turn 2 Foundation, established in 1996 by the Yankees captain and All-Star shortstop who retired in 2014 after 20 years in the game and whose No. 2 jersey was retired by the team earlier this year.

The foundation’s president is Jeter’s sister, Sharlee Jeter. Derek Jeter also made a $150,000 donation, raising the new center’s total to $1 million.

Opioid crisis: Lake Worth art and film festival in July aims to raise awareness

A film and art festival aimed at raising awareness to the opioid epidemic will be held next month in downtown Lake Worth.

Set for July 7-9, the Art of Recovery Film Festival and Art Exhibit will feature paintings, photographs and films created by people in recovery.

Manny Mendez, Vic James and Mark Sanchez, co-organizers of the festival, stand by an illustration made by Mendez about people lost to addiction. (Photo by Joe Capozzi)

“It is our mission to restore hope and bring awareness through artistic expressions,” said Manny Mendez, co-organizer of the festival with Vic Guy and Mark Sanchez.

Paintings and photographs will be displayed at the Armory Art Center Annex, 1121 Lucerne Ave. Films will be shown at the Stonzek Theater next to the Lake Worth Playhouse.

Admission is free. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will benefit Restoration Bridge and The Fellowship Foundation Recovery Community Organization.

Local artists are welcome to create and showcase during the festival. For more information, go to the festival’s webpage or call Mendez at 561 889 7230.

“The entire concept and each artistic medium is recovery-focused,’’ said Mendez, who wants the festival to “inspire hope in the lives of many struggling with addiction issues.

He hopes to festival educates people “who are not familiar with the addiction and recovery process” and helps “lift the stigma around addiction

Opioids crisis: Medical Examiner loses key doctor as caseload keeps rising

Palm Beach County commissioners could be asked again this year to add more positions to help the Medical Examiner’s Office keep pace with a rising caseload driven by the opioid epidemic.

A new associate medical examiner and a new technician will start July 3, roughly three months after county commissioners approved the addition of those two positions.

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But the office recently lost a key position when one of its doctors left to take a job with the Broward County Medical Examiner’s Office. That means the new doctor that starts on July 3 will essentially replace the doctor who left, keeping the Palm Beach County’s Medical Examiner’s Office at five doctors instead of six.

“It will be some time before the newly added position will help reduce the examiner workload,’’ deputy county administrator Jon Van Arnam said Thursday in an email to commissioners.

“The number of new cases continues to increase at an unprecedented rate, stressing staff and the system. If this trend continues, it could necessitate us returning to the (County Commission) for additional positions later this year or early next year.’’

Dr. Michael Bell, Palm Beach County medical examiner.

To help reduce the possibility of losing more doctors, Van Arnam has suggested the county’s Medical Examiner, Dr. Michael Bell, conduct a salary and benefits survey.

“Pay and benefits are key factors in our ability to attract and retain qualified medical staff and investigators,’’ Van Arnam said in the email.

At the meeting in April about the opioid epidemic, county commissioners also approved a third position – an executive level drug czar – to oversee the county’s response to the drug crisis. That position could be filled later this year.

“This position is still being developed,’’ Van Arnam said.

“We are determining how to best (use) this position in coordination with key partners including the Health Care District, Southeast Florida Behavioral Health Network, Palm Beach County Fire Rescue and PBSO. We understand the urgency of this situation and will keep you informed of our progress.’’

Last year, the caseload for the Medical Examiner’s Office topped 2,000 for the first time.

“That’s a 60 percent increase in the last two years, which is almost exclusively due to these opioid overdoses,’’ Bell told county commissioners in April.

“It’s not like we’re getting more homicides. We’re not getting more heart attacks, more elder falls and head trauma. This is all due to opioid fatalities.”

MORE: Opioid overdose deaths double to nearly 600: ‘I don’t see any stop’

Got milk? DEA releases drug slang code words

The DEA has released its 2017 list of drug slang code words – the lingo used by dealers and addicts to refer to specific illicit and pharmaceutical drugs of abuse.

According to the DEA, the list “is designed as a ready reference for law enforcement personnel who are confronted by many of the hundreds of slang terms used to identify a wide variety of controlled substances, designer drugs, and synthetic compounds.”

How accurate are the terms? The DEA says it tries its best to keep up with the “ever-changing drug scene” but “subsequent additions, deletions and corrections are inevitable

The list provides slang terms for 24 drugs – some illicit, such as crack cocaine, and some pharmaceutical, such as Klonopin and Xanax.

Marijuana leads the group with the most monikers, including the classics – weed, kush and herb – and some lesser known – Gorilla glue, Green Mercedes Benz and Hairy ones. Fentanyl, a deadly drug rarely seen on the street 20 years ago, now has its own vernacular: Apache; Birria (mixed with heroin); Butter; China Girl; China White; Dragon’s Breath; Fent; Lollipop; Tango & Cash; Toe Tag Dope and White Girl.

As for “milk,” it is slang for cocaine.

Sober Home Task Force raids West Palm Beach treatment center

Wellness Center of Palm Beach is the latest drug treatment center to be raided by the Palm Beach County Sober Home Task Force. 

Delray Beach Police Det. Nicole Lucas, a member of the task force, reported the May 30 raid on her Facebook page and asked patients who want to give a statement to send her a private message on Facebook.  No arrests have been made as a result of the raid.

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The center is located at 2724 Australian Ave. in West Palm Beach.  According to Florida corporate records, the center was founded in 2014 by Jayeshkumar Dave of Parkland. Dave could not be reached for comment.  A voice message left on an answering machine at the center was not returned.

The Florida legislature tasked Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg with investigating corruption in South Florida’s drug treatment industry after numerous news reports about insurance fraud, patient brokering and kickbacks.

Since October, the task force has made 24 arrests and raided treatment centers and sober homes throughout the county.

Palm Beach Shores settles case of dispatcher harassed by cop

Palm Beach Shores is paying $150,000 to settle a lawsuit by a former dispatcher who claimed she’d been repeatedly sexually harassed by former town police officer Charles Hoeffer.

For the town, it’s the latest fallout relating to Hoeffer, whom the town paid $135,000 last year to leave after he was accused of raping a blind woman twice. The town is being sued by that woman and another who claims Hoeffer groped and harassed her.

Former Palm Beach Shores officer Charles Hoeffer attends an arbitration hearing on May 5, 2016. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

The dispatcher, Lori Saridakis, worked under Hoeffer’s supervision while she worked for the town. According to the 2015 lawsuit, he made crude comments to her, including asking her, “When are you gonna let me get some of that?” He would also grope himself in front of her, she said.

Ten months on paid leave: Officer faces assault allegations

11 women accuse cop of assault, rape or harassment

After she went to the town manager with her complaints, she was fired. The town said her position was simply eliminated.

“I’m happy it’s over for her,” Saridakis’ attorney, Arthur Schofield, said Thursday. “It was a long fight, and I’m proud of her for fighting, which other women couldn’t do or didn’t have the courage to do.”

At least one other dispatcher complained that she’d been harassed by Hoeffer. Saridakis could not be reached for comment.

The town’s insurance carrier, which is paying the settlement, agreed to settle just before the case went to trial. The settlement is not an admission of guilt.

The allegations against Hoeffer were first exposed in a 2015 Palm Beach Post article that revealed 11 different women had accused him of assault, rape or harassment over his three decades in policing with three different departments.

Last week, the national news site The Daily Beast profiled Hoeffer and his history in a lengthy exposé.

Schofield said he deposed Hoeffer for the lawsuit. He called it an “eye-opening experience,” although he didn’t uncover any new details about the officer’s history.

 

Houston Astros owner Jim Crane gets married at The Floridian

Houston Astros owner Jim Crane — whose team opened The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches earlier this year in West Palm Beach — got married over the Memorial Day weekend to Whitney Wheeler at his Floridian National Golf Club in Palm City.

(Photo courtesy of The Floridian National Golf Club)

The sunset wedding ceremony took place in front of more than 120 friends — all dressed in white —  on a grass bluff overlooking the resort’s marina. The couple stood between two large floral swan sculptures.

Country music star Clay Walker performed.  Guests included Houston Astros General Manager Jeff Luhnow, NBA Hall of Famer and Houston Rockets legend Clude Drexler and Monterey County Superior Court Judge Pamela Butler.

Whitney Crane wore a custom-designed wedding gown by Carolina Herrera.

Astros owner Jim Crane (leaning forward) listens to County Commission debate Sept. 23, 2014. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

No officials from West Palm Beach or Palm Beach County attended the wedding. Crane attended several County Commission meetings over the last few years to lobby officials for the $113 million in bed-tax revenue that helped finance The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches.

The Astros share the spring training facility with the Washington Nationals. The $150 million complex is located south of 45th Street between Haverhill Road and Military Trail.

Crane owns the Floridian, where he has hosted then-President Obama and golf legend Tiger Woods.

 

Jim and Whitney Crane got married Saturday at The Floridian (Photo courtesy of The Floridian)

 

 

We first exposed Kenny Chatman. He tried to sue us for it.

When The Palm Beach Post first wrote about corrupt drug treatment center owner Kenny Chatman – a year before his arrest – the story exposed Chatman as a liar, fraud and potential sex trafficker.

Apparently, Chatman didn’t like it.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate, in 2015.

Court files show that he had lawyer Jeffrey Cohen, of the Florida Healthcare Law Firm, run up $5,000 in billings investigating whether to sue The Palm Beach Post for defamation.

Cohen had a fellow lawyer pull the police records The Post cited in its story. He also called four different South Florida lawyers who specialize in defamation cases to try to get them on board.

“Teleconference with Benny Lebdecker (sic) re meeting to discuss possible lawsuit against Palm Beach Post,” reads one entry in Cohen’s list of billable hours.

“Discussions with Attorney Bruce Rogow re Palm Beach Post article and retention of his services,” reads another.

Chatman and his treatment center’s medical director, Barry Gregory, teleconferenced with Cohen multiple times between December 2015, when The Post’s article ran, and January 2016, the records show.

Ultimately, Chatman never pursued a lawsuit against The Post, and in December, he was arrested by the FBI. He pleaded guilty to conspiracies to commit sex trafficking, money laundering and health care fraud, and last week was given a 27-year sentence in federal prison.

RELATED: ‘Kenny Chatman kidnapped me:’ Read one woman’s human trafficking story

Gregory pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and false statements regarding health care matters, and he was sentenced to five years in prison.

Normally, such billable hours are rarely made public, especially if a case doesn’t go to trial. So how did The Post find out about it?

Chatman racked up more than $5,000 in legal fees with Cohen – a relative pittance considering Chatman built his fraudulent treatment centers into multimillion-dollar operations.

But Chatman never paid the bills, and last year, Cohen sued him over it. The billable hours were included in the lawsuit. Chatman quickly paid up. (Read the bills here.)

When asked about it in March, after Chatman pleaded guilty, Cohen said he couldn’t talk about it, since Chatman was a former client.

Cohen has taken a contrarian view on some of the issues surrounding the addiction treatment industry. He’s been one of the few people to publicly criticize the efforts of the Palm Beach County Sober Home Task Force, which has arrested more than a dozen people in the industry for fraud and recommended widespread legislative reforms.

“They’re trying to kill cockroaches with shotguns,” he told The Post in March. “The way in which they’re going about it, sometimes, is eyebrow-raising.”

(He’s also been critical of The Post’s extensive coverage of South Florida’s drug treatment industry, calling it “a story in search of a villain.”)

Whether or not a lawsuit against The Post would have been successful is obviously unknown. But the Chatman story, like all the big stories by the paper’s investigative team, are thoroughly reviewed for potential libel issues by The Post’s lawyers.

‘Kenny Chatman kidnapped me’: Read one woman’s human trafficking story

Corrupt drug treatment operator Kenny Chatman will be sentenced Wednesday, and for the past few weeks, parents and victims have been writing letters to U.S. District Judge Donald Middlebrooks, telling him that they believe Chatman killed their children or furthered their addictions.

But perhaps none of the letters is as chilling as one filed with the court Monday, from a woman who says Chatman kidnapped her and forced her into prostitution. Then, after she escaped and told police, she says Chatman confronted her again and forced her to sign a sworn statement recanting.

Chatman has admitted to many of the details mentioned in the letter, and he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit sex trafficking, along with conspiracies to commit money laundering and health care fraud. He faces up to life in prison.

The woman’s letter is so chilling that The Palm Beach Post is choosing to publish it in its entirety:

My name is (redacted)

I’m 22 years old. I came down to Florida in 2013 for substance abuse treatment. I’ve been struggling with addiction since I was 11 years old.

I first met Kenny Chatman in 2015 at age 19. Kenny Chatman kidnapped me. I was brought to the house by some of the men that worked for him, as well as himself. Upon entering the house I was punched in the face and lost consciousness.

When I woke up at the house, there were restraints on my wrists and ankles attached to a bed post. There were other girls present at the house, severely under the influence, almost to the point of unconsciousness. They took all my belongings, including my clothes. They IV drugged me with an unknown sedative. And from that point on, men came in and paid him money to rape me.

He had me extremely intoxicated on unknown sedatives and substances that I was going in and out of consciousness but was completely aware of myself being raped, molested, emotionally, mentally physically, sexually abused, and verbally demeaned.

I recall close to 150 in total different faces of rapists abusing me daily over a period of 3-4 weeks. I was unrestrained for brief periods, only to be cleaned up of bodily fluids. I thought I was going to die there, in fact, I was convinced after several days.

After roughly 4 weeks of enduring countless abusive and sexual acts being performed against my will, I managed to jump out of a window while unrestrained and escape in solely a tshirt. I flagged down a car, and went home.

I later contacted local authorities and made a full police report naming Kenny Chatman as the perpetrator and captor. I was contacted by the FBI and detectives of the local police force to question me and get information from me about what happened.

This event has completely changed my life in every way. Emotionally, physically, mentally, and even in relationships with others. I’m terrified of men. I can’t have a normal intimate relationship yet. I have constant night terrors and flashbacks to this day of the events that have happened to me because of this man.

I have struggled to stay sober since these events took place in 2015, which is extremely upsetting since I had close to 2 years sober prior to it. After these events I was placed back in treatment and am still to this day receiving countless hours of trauma therapy, as well as addiction counseling. I’ve done over a year of EMDR therapy.

Long after I came forward with these events, I was confronted by Kenny Chatman again and forced into a vehicle and threatened and taken to a notary and forced to sign a document recanting my previous statements against him.

Once again, I was paralyzed with fear. In a place where you are supposed to feel the safest, TREATMENT, I experienced some of the most gruesome acts that I can think of.

Today, my hope is that justice will be served and Kenny Chatman is permanently removed from the streets so not only can he not get me again, but so he can’t do this to other human beings.

What happens to addicts if Obamacare and the Drug Czar get the boot?

Last week was not a good week for addicts. 

The House vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act – Obamacare – could be catastrophic for those with substance use disorders. The Senate still must approve it but provisions in the House version could allow insurance companies to refuse to cover and charge higher premiums for pre-existing conditions.

If you are an addict that’s been to rehab six or seven times – each time covered by insurance because of Obamacare – you have a pre-existing condition – big time. States would have the option to waive an Obamacare mandate that prohibits insurance companies from charging higher rates to those with pre-existing conditions. 

 That means you are going to pay more – probably a lot more – for insurance because you have a very expensive, pre-existing condition (addiction) that has a high rate of recurrence (relapse.)

But don’t worry. If you can’t get insurance because your state opted out of Obamacare’ pre-existing condition mandate, you will be able to purchase insurance from your state’s high risk pool. Guess how much THAT will cost. Bigly.

The House plan also allows states to opt out of another Obamacare mandate that insurance companies must cover essential, basic benefits like maternity care, preventive tests and, you guessed it, substance use disorders. State’s will be allowed to set their own standards. 

So, getting covered for your substance use disorder will depend on where you live and how strong the insurance lobby is in your state, 

I have more bad news.

The Trump Administration’s proposal to cut funding for the Office of National Drug Control Policy from $388 million to $24 million – effectively dismantles the ONDCP – also known as the office of the Drug Czar. POLITICO reported the proposal last week, along with comments from Rafael Lemaitre, formerly a senior official with the drug policy office across three administrations. 

“These moves fly in the face of President Trump’s promise to address the nation’s opioid epidemic,” said Lemaitre. “This is an epidemic that steals as many lives as the Vietnam War took during the entire conflict, and Trump’s moves remove some of the most effective tools.”

Trump strategy to fulfill his campaign promise to fix the opioid crisis was outlined in an executive order that created a temporary White House opioids commission led by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. 

The drug commission is part of the new White House Office of American Innovation, chaired by the president’s 36-year-old son-in-law Jared Kushner, Under Kushner, the office is responsible for overhauling the federal bureaucracy. 

According to a report by PBS Newshour, the commission will:

  • Identify existing federal dollars to combat drug addiction, including opioids;
  • Assess availability and access to addiction treatment centers and overdose reversal and identify underserved areas;
  • Measure the effectiveness of state prescription drug monitoring programs;
  • Evaluate public messaging campaigns about prescription and illegal opioids, and identify best practices for drug prevention.

The commission must file its report by Oct. 1. Then it will disband. No one knows what – if anything – will replace it.