State senator blasts Palm Beach Post, calls reporting ‘criminal’

State Sen. Bobby Powell blasted The Palm Beach Post’s recent report on fraud in the 2016 August primary election Tuesday night, saying the reporting in a Sunday story “should be criminal.”

At a public forum, Powell and state Rep. Al Jacquet took aim at The Post and State Attorney’s Office investigators looking into absentee ballot fraud in the primary election. Detectives found nearly two dozen fraudulent signatures on absentee ballot request forms but couldn’t identify a suspect, The Post reported.

State Rep. Al Jacquet, left, and state Sen. Bobby Powell at a legislative wrap-up forum on Tuesday, July 25, 2017.

“It’s distasteful,” Powell told the audience of roughly 80 people. “It should be criminal that newspapers can print something like that and implicate.”

EXCLUSIVE: Read The Post’s report into last year’s primary election

Jacquet took aim at the detectives who questioned voters, calling their behavior “criminal” and “unconstitutional.” Fourteen Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office detectives were assigned to interview voters.

“Someone comes to your door in uniform, bangs on your door and says, ‘Who did you vote for? How did you vote for them? Why did you vote for them? Did they give you anything to vote for them?'” Jacquet said. “This is not only criminal, this is unconstitutional civil rights violations. This is singling out one group of folks and literally intimidating them, suppressing their right to vote.”

Powell said the story was “flawed.”

“The story was not truthful, and it was done in order to damage the credibility of myself, (County Commissioner) Mack Bernard and Al Jacquet,” he said.

VOTER FRAUD: Read the State Attorney’s investigation into the primary election

Jacquet received enthusiastic applause after he said that voter suppression tactics wouldn’t work in the next election.

I guarantee you that’s not going to happen,” Jacquet said. “We’re just getting started.”

The Post on Sunday reported that prosecutors were ending their investigation into voter fraud in the August primary, despite finding 22 people whose signatures were forged on absentee ballot request forms.

The reason the case was dropped is because the lead detectives on the case, a Palm Beach County Sheriff’s sergeant and West Palm Beach detective assigned to the state attorney’s public corruption unit, couldn’t find a suspect.

Detectives didn’t follow up on basic leads, didn’t interview people who might have known about the fraud and waited eight months before following up with voters who made complaints.

Detectives also never followed up on The Post’s March story, in which voters said Jacquet and Bernard went into their homes, helped them fill out their ballots and collected them. Collecting other people’s ballots is a felony, the report states.

Powell, who said he brought copies of the report to Tuesday’s forum, said that the state attorney’s report does not “in any point indicate that our campaigns were under investigation.”

Read how 30% of Florida’s voting is ripe for fraud

The report does not mention Powell, and only mentions Bernard and Jacquet briefly.

But 17 of the 22 victims, which included a state attorney’s employee and her three family members, were in a narrow area where Jacquet’s, Powell’s and Bernard’s districts intersect.

And the only “person of interest” in the case was Delano Allen, whom detectives never interviewed. He was seen on video dropping off bundles of absentee ballot request forms.

Detectives never mentioned in their report that Allen is Powell’s longtime legislative aide.

Powell on Tuesday came to Allen’s defense, saying that other people must have been dropping off ballot request forms for other campaigns, too.

Delano Allen is my legislative aide,” he said, gesturing toward Allen. “In the paper they indicated that he dropped off ballot requests, almost saying that’s illegal. I’m sure that during the election season, that many Democratic clubs, Republican clubs, many other people dropped off absentee ballot requests. But when it came down to implicating him as to turning in one ballot, he turned in none. That was not reported. Unacceptable.”

It’s not illegal to drop off ballot request forms. The report does not mention Allen turning in absentee ballots. That would be illegal.

After he made his remarks, Powell criticized a Post reporter, telling the reporter that the newspaper didn’t mention that detectives found six fraudulent absentee ballots, which were from outside his district.

But detectives actually found that the ballots were not fraudulent.

“It was determined that 6 absentee ballots were possibly altered, forged, or obtained in a fraudulent way,” the report states. “It was determined through the course of the investigation that there was no criminal activity associated with these absentee ballots.”

After Powell spoke, Jacquet questioned why the three Democrats were even singled out for absentee ballots.

When you go to the division of elections and see the number of absentee ballots that counted in the recent election, the number has continued to skyrocket, because voters are now realizing that they don’t have to stand in line for two, three hours,” he said. “Why single out one group?”

But the candidates’ performance in absentee ballots was well above normal. Their opponents cried foul, and elections experts considered the results suspicious.

In some precincts, Bernard and Jacquet won nine of every 10 absentee ballots cast. They also drastically outperformed the top-ticket U.S. Senate candidates. In one Boynton Beach precinct, for example, 135 more people voted for Jacquet than for all the U.S. Senate candidates combined.

“When you have that type of down-ballot voting that exceeds the top of the ticket, it raises some suspicions,” University of Florida professor Daniel Smith told The Post in March.

Tuesday’s event was intended to give constituents a wrap-up of the Legislative session. But Powell said they first had to address the “elephant in the room.”

The audience included various local elected officials and former candidates, including Edwin Ferguson, a lawyer who lost to Jacquet in the August Democratic primary.

Ferguson actually beat Jacquet at the polls by 132 votes. But Jacquet’s extraordinary 1,167-vote edge in absentee votes easily won him the race.

Ferguson, who is running for the county School Board District 7 seat, declined to address the controversy on Wednesday.

“We came up short,” Ferguson said. “We’ll try to do better next time.”

Doctor in Kenny Chatman case pleads guilty to health care fraud

Dr. Joaquin Mendez, a former medical director for Kenny Chatman’s notorious Reflections Treatment Center, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud today.

He faces up to 10 years in federal prison.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate, in 2015.

Mendez was the last holdout among eight people arrested in a fraudulent multi-million dollar drug treatment operation run by Chatman.

He admitted today to being essentially a doctor in name only for Reflections between September 2014 and September 2015. Although Mendez was supposed to be seeing patients and dictating their medical care, Chatman was the one deciding when people would get tested.

RELATED: ‘Kenny Chatman kidnapped me:’ Read one woman’s human trafficking story

Mendez would sign doctor’s orders without ever seeing the patients. He also signed off on hundreds of “certificates of medical necessity” for urine and saliva tests after the testing had already been done – and in some cases, the patients had already been discharged from Reflections.

If he had been closely following the drug test results, he would have noticed that up to 90% of the people in Chatman’s care were actively using drugs.

His actions helped turn Reflections, in Margate, and Chatman’s chain of sober homes into a multi-million dollar operation, despite Chatman having no experience in health care when he founded the facility in 2013.

Chatman’s crimes went far beyond health care fraud, however. His sober homes throughout Palm Beach County were houses of horror, where drug use was rampant and where some female patients were kept chained up so he could prostitute them. At least four people died of overdoses while in his care.

Chatman was sentenced to 27 1/2 years in prison in May. All of the other defendants also took plea deals, including another doctor and Chatman’s wife.

Mendez had held out because his attorneys, Richard Lubin and Anthony Vitale, wanted more time to review the mountain of evidence in the case, which included 326 gigabytes of digital records and 225 boxes of paper records.

Lubin said today that after reviewing the evidence, Mendez chose to plead guilty.

Mendez is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 27.

Doctor in Kenny Chatman case expected to plead guilty

The last defendant in Kenny Chatman’s drug treatment fraud scheme is expected to plead guilty, according to a Thursday court filing.

Dr. Joaquin Mendez had pleaded not guilty to federal charges of money laundering and conspiracy to commit health care fraud. What he will plead guilty to is unknown; a change of plea hearing is scheduled for July 14.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate, in 2015.

He was the final holdout among eight people arrested in a multi-million-dollar drug treatment operation created by Chatman, who was sentenced to 27 1/2 years in prison in May.

Chatman, a felon who had no experience in health care before he created Reflections Treatment Center in Broward County in 2013, also trafficked his female patients. In his sober homes scattered throughout Palm Beach County, he held women captive and prostituted them.

RELATED: ‘Kenny Chatman kidnapped me:’ Read one woman’s human trafficking story

Together, the defendants will have to pay back millions to more than a dozen insurance companies that were defrauded.

Mendez was a former medical director for the Reflections. One of the reasons he declined to take a plea deal is because his veteran defense attorney, Richard Lubin, wanted more time to evaluate the evidence.

The amount of evidence in the case was “massive” – more than he’d ever seen in his 42 years in law, Lubin wrote earlier this year. It included:

  • 326 gigabytes of digital records copied onto an encrypted hard drive.
  • 236,245 digital files organized into 8,307 folders
  • 16,064 records in 133 files of patient data
  • 1,719 patient case files with as many as 600 pages in each file
  • 30 FBI taped interviews
  • 225 boxes of paper documents that prosecutors said would take 6-8 weeks to copy

Chatman was first exposed in a 2015 Palm Beach Post story. He was also recently profiled by NBC News.

Drug treatment center doctor who worked for Kenny Chatman will stay out of jail

A doctor who worked for corrupt treatment center operator Kenny Chatman will not be going back to jail – at least for now.

Federal prosecutors wanted Dr. Joaquin Mendez, who is out on $100,000 bond, back behind bars after they argued he violated the terms of his release by treating patients and prescribing opioids.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate, in 2015.

But Mendez’s lawyer, Richard Lubin, argued the terms were vague, and both sides agreed last week simply to amend the terms of his release.

Mendez, a former medical director for Chatman’s corrupt Reflections Treatment Center, is the only one of eight defendants not to have taken a plea deal for their involvement with the facility.

The seven others, including Chatman and his wife, Laura, were sentenced to a combined 58 years in prison.

Mendez has been charged with money laundering and conspiracy to commit health care fraud for ordering unnecessary urine drug tests for addicts, according to prosecutors.

One of the terms of his release, added in handwriting to the paperwork, was that he “not use his Medicare number to provide any services.”

Prosecutors said he violated those terms after he treated at least 188 Medicare patients wrote more than 100 prescriptions for controlled substances that included oxycodone, Oxycontin, clonazepam and fentanyl.

Lubin, his lawyer, argued the terms were weirdly vague.

“Not only is this Court and Dr. Mendez left guessing at what it means to ‘treat patients using his Medicare number,’ it is entirely unclear what the Government means by ‘Medicare number,'” Lubin wrote.

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Apparently the ‘Medicare number’ prosecutors referenced was Mendez’s Provider Transaction Access Number, which Lubin said had “absolutely nothing to do with” Medicare claims.

On Thursday, both sides agreed to changing the terms of release.

Mendez is one of two doctors in charge of overseeing patient care at Chatman’s facilities to be arrested. Last Week, Dr. Donald Willems was sentenced to 10 years in prison – the maximum sentence – after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud.

Chatman was sentenced to 27 years in prison last month after admitting to turning his female patients into prostitutes and pimping them out online.

Palm Beach Shores settles case of dispatcher harassed by cop

Palm Beach Shores is paying $150,000 to settle a lawsuit by a former dispatcher who claimed she’d been repeatedly sexually harassed by former town police officer Charles Hoeffer.

For the town, it’s the latest fallout relating to Hoeffer, whom the town paid $135,000 last year to leave after he was accused of raping a blind woman twice. The town is being sued by that woman and another who claims Hoeffer groped and harassed her.

Former Palm Beach Shores officer Charles Hoeffer attends an arbitration hearing on May 5, 2016. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

The dispatcher, Lori Saridakis, worked under Hoeffer’s supervision while she worked for the town. According to the 2015 lawsuit, he made crude comments to her, including asking her, “When are you gonna let me get some of that?” He would also grope himself in front of her, she said.

Ten months on paid leave: Officer faces assault allegations

11 women accuse cop of assault, rape or harassment

After she went to the town manager with her complaints, she was fired. The town said her position was simply eliminated.

“I’m happy it’s over for her,” Saridakis’ attorney, Arthur Schofield, said Thursday. “It was a long fight, and I’m proud of her for fighting, which other women couldn’t do or didn’t have the courage to do.”

At least one other dispatcher complained that she’d been harassed by Hoeffer. Saridakis could not be reached for comment.

The town’s insurance carrier, which is paying the settlement, agreed to settle just before the case went to trial. The settlement is not an admission of guilt.

The allegations against Hoeffer were first exposed in a 2015 Palm Beach Post article that revealed 11 different women had accused him of assault, rape or harassment over his three decades in policing with three different departments.

Last week, the national news site The Daily Beast profiled Hoeffer and his history in a lengthy exposé.

Schofield said he deposed Hoeffer for the lawsuit. He called it an “eye-opening experience,” although he didn’t uncover any new details about the officer’s history.

 

We first exposed Kenny Chatman. He tried to sue us for it.

When The Palm Beach Post first wrote about corrupt drug treatment center owner Kenny Chatman – a year before his arrest – the story exposed Chatman as a liar, fraud and potential sex trafficker.

Apparently, Chatman didn’t like it.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate, in 2015.

Court files show that he had lawyer Jeffrey Cohen, of the Florida Healthcare Law Firm, run up $5,000 in billings investigating whether to sue The Palm Beach Post for defamation.

Cohen had a fellow lawyer pull the police records The Post cited in its story. He also called four different South Florida lawyers who specialize in defamation cases to try to get them on board.

“Teleconference with Benny Lebdecker (sic) re meeting to discuss possible lawsuit against Palm Beach Post,” reads one entry in Cohen’s list of billable hours.

“Discussions with Attorney Bruce Rogow re Palm Beach Post article and retention of his services,” reads another.

Chatman and his treatment center’s medical director, Barry Gregory, teleconferenced with Cohen multiple times between December 2015, when The Post’s article ran, and January 2016, the records show.

Ultimately, Chatman never pursued a lawsuit against The Post, and in December, he was arrested by the FBI. He pleaded guilty to conspiracies to commit sex trafficking, money laundering and health care fraud, and last week was given a 27-year sentence in federal prison.

RELATED: ‘Kenny Chatman kidnapped me:’ Read one woman’s human trafficking story

Gregory pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and false statements regarding health care matters, and he was sentenced to five years in prison.

Normally, such billable hours are rarely made public, especially if a case doesn’t go to trial. So how did The Post find out about it?

Chatman racked up more than $5,000 in legal fees with Cohen – a relative pittance considering Chatman built his fraudulent treatment centers into multimillion-dollar operations.

But Chatman never paid the bills, and last year, Cohen sued him over it. The billable hours were included in the lawsuit. Chatman quickly paid up. (Read the bills here.)

When asked about it in March, after Chatman pleaded guilty, Cohen said he couldn’t talk about it, since Chatman was a former client.

Cohen has taken a contrarian view on some of the issues surrounding the addiction treatment industry. He’s been one of the few people to publicly criticize the efforts of the Palm Beach County Sober Home Task Force, which has arrested more than a dozen people in the industry for fraud and recommended widespread legislative reforms.

“They’re trying to kill cockroaches with shotguns,” he told The Post in March. “The way in which they’re going about it, sometimes, is eyebrow-raising.”

(He’s also been critical of The Post’s extensive coverage of South Florida’s drug treatment industry, calling it “a story in search of a villain.”)

Whether or not a lawsuit against The Post would have been successful is obviously unknown. But the Chatman story, like all the big stories by the paper’s investigative team, are thoroughly reviewed for potential libel issues by The Post’s lawyers.

Adviser for notorious treatment center sentenced to nearly 5 years in prison

A former clinical director at the notorious drug rehab center run by Kenneth “Kenny” Chatman was sentenced to four years and nine months in federal prison today.

Barry Gregory was responsible for overseeing patients’ treatment plans at Chatman’s Reflections Treatment Center. But he largely turned a blind eye to problems there; he admitted in February to signing orders for patients to take urine and saliva tests that weren’t necessary, and he ordered DNA and allergy tests regardless of whether patients complained of allergies.

Dr. Barry Gregory, former clinical director for Reflections Treatment Center

He also said that as many as 90 percent of Reflections’ patients were actively using drugs.

Gregory pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud and knowingly falsifying a matter involving health care programs.

He joins six other people, including Chatman’s wife, who have pleaded guilty to various federal crimes related to Chatman’s drug treatment centers.

Chatman, first exposed in a 2015 Palm Beach Post story, created Reflections in a central Broward County strip mall in 2013. In Palm Beach County, he ran a series of sober homes that were notorious drug dens. He admitted last month to turning some of his female patients into prostitutes, pimping them out on websites like Craigslist and Backpage.

Chatman built Reflections into a multi-million dollar treatment center, and Gregory, a licensed mental health counselor, was instrumental in making that happen.

Chatman hired him in July 2015 to a position where Gregory would oversee addicts’ treatment and counseling. But Chatman was the one who dictated which patients were admitted and how they were treated, Gregory admitted.

When he was hired, Reflections was still on probation with the Department of Children and Family Services. Gregory was the one who filled out the forms to get Reflections fully licensed. To do so, he helped hide the business under Chatman’s wife’s name; because Chatman was a felon, he couldn’t legally own or operate a treatment center.

When Chatman wanted to open up a second treatment center, Journey to Recovery, in Lake Worth, Gregory again helped him fill out the forms, knowing that Chatman, and not Laura, was the real owner of the business.

Federal prosecutors said Gregory has shown remorse for his actions.

“While the defendant has not yet completed his cooperation, he has fully accepted responsibility, recognized his wrongdoing and shown true remorse, and assisted significantly in the investigation,” federal prosecutors wrote in a recent filing.

Chatman and his wife are scheduled to be sentenced May 17. He faces up to life behind bars. His wife, Laura, faces up to 10 years in prison.

 

Owner of notorious drug treatment center pleads guilty today

Drug treatment center owner Kenneth “Kenny” Chatman pleaded guilty Wednesday to conspiracy to commit health care fraud, money laundering and conspiracy to recruit persons into sexual acts, a charge that could send him to prison for life.

His wife, Laura Chatman, pleaded guilty to two counts of falsifying and covering up the ownership of the treatment centers. She applied for state licensure for the facilities even though her husband, a felon, was the one owning and operating them. She faces up to 10 years in prison.

Their sentencing will be May 17 at 10 a.m.

Kenneth Chatman walks into Reflections, his treatment center in Margate in December, 2015.

Chatman had been charged with conspiracy to commit sex trafficking, money laundering and conspiracy to commit health care fraud. His wife had been charged with conspiracy to commit health care fraud and multiple counts of money laundering.

Chatman owned Reflections Treatment Center in central Broward County and operated sober homes throughout Palm Beach County. The places were notorious drug dens, with up to 90 percent of patients – who were supposed to be getting sober – doing drugs.

Chatman’s ties to prostitution were first exposed by The Palm Beach Post in December, 2015. Nearly a year later, federal authorities arrested him.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

State Attorney’s sober home task force meeting today

In its last session, the Legislature gave funding to State Attorney Dave Aronberg to establish a task force to come up with recommendations on how to clean up the sober home industry.

Today, it’s having its first full meeting, with the goal of driving out bad operators and increasing the quality of care for recovering addicts.

What the group will ultimately recommend to the Legislature is still a mystery, but a smaller meeting of the task force, on Tuesday, laid out what it won’t do. And Chief Assistant State Attorney Al Johnson, which is leading the group, gave it some areas to focus on.

First, what it won’t do:

  • Johnson said the task force won’t be looking at zoning requirements for sober homes (federal laws make that illegal).
  • It won’t be going after drug addicts or good operators.
  • It won’t be focusing on prosecuting bad operators, although Johnson said the State Attorney’s Office is convening a grand jury to look at the overall issue.

“We can’t prosecute ourselves out of this,” Johnson said Tuesday. “We’re going to knock some heads, I presume. We’re not sitting on our hands. We have a lot of tips coming in.”

Today’s meeting is open to the public and will be held from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the community room of the West Palm Beach Police Department at 600 Banyan Blvd.

So far, the task force is looking at tackling four key issues:

Who should regulate the recovery industry?

Nearly everyone agrees that Florida’s Department of Children and Families, which currently oversees drug treatment centers, doesn’t have the resources to do it adequately.

Instead, the state’s Agency for Health Care Administration, which licenses health care facilities, is widely considered the more appropriate department for the job, and the task force will look at whether transferring the responsibilities is possible.

Sober homes, however, can’t be regulated because of federal housing and disability laws.

But the idea is to get them voluntarily certified by an accrediting agency — in this case, the Florida Association of Recovery Residences, which has strict guidelines and requirements for its members.

But FARR doesn’t have enough funding to certify the thousands of sober homes in the state. So one of the task force members proposed having the members themselves fund the process. Johnson said that could be a good idea.

“If we left this up to DCF to license and register, we’d be little better off than where we are now,” Johnson said. “Sometimes when an industry regulates its own, it can be as effect or more effective than government.”

Clearing up the laws

Much of the task force’s focus is going to be clearing up the laws to make it clear what’s legal and what’s not.

At Tuesday’s meeting, lawyers for sober homes said their clients spend a lot of money on lawyers simply to figure out how to operate within the law.

That’s because the laws are confusing, said Mark Fontaine, executive director of the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association.

“The providers want clarity. They want to know what’s okay and what’s not okay,” he said.

How should recovering addicts pay for rent at sober homes?

Current patient brokering laws don’t allow medical providers to bribe patients to go to their business or pay for headhunters to lure patients.

That also goes for the drug treatment industry. But patient brokering is considered rampant in the industry, with recovering addicts often enticed to stay at sober homes with offers of free gifts or free rent.

But it’s not really free. In some cases, the addict has to go to a particular outpatient therapy during the day, which charges the person’s insurance. Or the sober home simply wants the addicts in the home so it can make money drug-testing them.

Johnson proposed a radical idea: make it legal for treatment centers to pay for an addicts’ rent at a certified sober home.

That would accomplish two things: good sober homes would automatically have a leg up on the bad actors, because they’d be certified, and bad actors would be encouraged to clean up their act and get certified.

How should sober homes be marketed?

This is another gray area.

Fontaine wanted to know if anything could be done about treatment centers or sober homes that falsely advertise their services or facilities. He said he spoke to one addict’s mother, for example,

And there’s another area of marketing that is a source of concern. Many sober home and treatment center operators will pay people, known as “marketers,” to bring in patients, which is illegal.

But the industry wants that cleared up, too. Attorney Jeffrey Lynne said licensed interventionists are worried about how they can be paid for their work without violating the patient brokering laws.

“That’s what their job is, to do intake and where to place someone,” Lynne said. “Their whole profession has been tainted by this concept of marketing.”

Fired Palm Beach Shores cop accused of rape wanted $575K to settle case

Former Palm Beach Shores officer Charles Hoeffer attends an arbitration hearing where he is arguing for his job back in West Palm Beach, FL on May 5, 2016. Palm Beach Shores police chief says FBI is not going to pursue charges against Hoeffer, who is alleged to have committed sexual assault. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Former Palm Beach Shores officer Charles Hoeffer attends an arbitration hearing where he is arguing for his job back. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

The former Palm Beach Shores officer fighting to get his job back after being accused of rape wanted $575,000 to make himself go away.

On the day before his arbitration hearing last week, Charles Hoeffer’s police union lawyer proposed a settlement that would also allow the former officer to retire in good standing.

“We will accept a lump sum of payment of $575,000.00,” Police Benevolent Association lawyer Larry Fagan wrote in an email to the lawyer representing Palm Beach Shores. “We’ll pay the taxes.”

The town rejected the offer.

Hoeffer spent nearly two years on paid leave while the Riviera Beach police, prosecutors and the FBI investigated claims that he twice raped a blind woman while on duty in 2014. Prosecutors and the FBI decided not to charge him with a crime.

Ten other women have accused him of rape, sexual harassment or domestic violence over his 27-year career. One of those women is a former Palm Beach Shores police dispatcher who is now suing the town.

He was fired in January after his police certification expired, an unusual loophole that Hoeffer is fighting. An arbitrator is expected to rule on the case in July.

Fagan calculated the large settlement sum because he said Hoeffer, 54, could work another 8 to 10 years. At the time he was fired, he was being paid $56,622 annually, including supervisor’s pay.

Ten years of pay, with 3 percent increases, would be nearly $650,000, not counting overtime, special details and the supervisor’s pay, which is about $3,000 per year.

That, plus $18,866 in back pay and 750 hours of accrued vacation, holiday and sick leave would total $691,300, Fagan calculated in the proposal.

Despite that amount, Hoeffer was willing to take the $575,000 in a lump sum, Fagan wrote.